Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘summer drinks’

Campari

Oh how I miss those apéritif adverts of the 1970s  …anytime anyplace anywhere, there’s a wonderful drink you can share, it’s the bright one, the right one, thaaat’s Martiniii…  I’ve been yearning for the fabulous life ever since.

But it turns out Leonard Rossiter was an arrogant egotist – he referred to Joan Collins as the Prop!  Such unforgivable rudeness earned Cinzano no place on my drinks trolley, yet despite its unspeakably common Luton airport advert, Campari is captivating, its bitter orange tang irresistible at the end of a hot day.

Campari soda

Half fill a tall glass with ice, pour over 50ml Campari and top up with 50ml or less soda.

Swizzle, garnish with a slice of fresh orange and enjoy the glow.

The Martini life could get you dashed up on the rocks so I’ll cling to Campari: cin cin!

The big mystery is Campari’s lack of popularity in the UK

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

borage flowersAh, true sunny delight: the borage is in bloom.  Such pretty periwinkle blue flowers, all set to adorn a glass of Pimm’s® for whiling away an English summer afternoon.

Wood on willow, polite applause, chin-chin…you get the scene.  But there’s something wrong with this picture, surely?  Firstly it’s most likely raining and secondly, is not Pimm’s impossibly bland when made properly?  And possibly improper when not?  For truly it’s a merry devil of a drink, slipping down far too easily and bringing upright folk, even the odd marquee, down in its wake as stilettoes catch in turf and guy ropes do service as guard rails…

Try this recipe for the classic Pimm’s® Cup cocktail…
Over ice, pour:

  • 1 part Pimm’s® No.1
  • 2 to 3 parts clear, fizzy lemonade (eg Sprite®)
  • Infuse with borage flowers, fresh mint and slices of lemon, orange and apple.

..and you too can turn your garden party into The Wasteland.

But there’s more to borage than that; why not use the stems and leaves too?  With a delicate cucumber-like flavour they cook to a texture similar to that of chard leaves or beet greens, with which they are often prepared around the Mediterranean as a pasta stuffing or filling for pies and omelettes.  The flowers also make a delightful addition to salads and only the churlish could despise them as a garnish on any summery dish.

I’ll follow with a couple of tasty recipes once I have some pix to go with

Read Full Post »